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Welcome to Mundy’s Asia Galleries!

buddhahead.jpg The finest collection of Buddhist artifacts and Japanese antiques. We guarantee the period of our pieces and will work with you to make sure you have all the information you need to make the right choice. Our gallery is located in Boston’s South End Neighborhood at the corner of E.Berkeley St. and Harrison Ave. We are open Year round,( Wed -Sun 11am-6pm) TEL 857 753 4772. Our warehouse is located at 420 Stockbridge Rd, (RTE 7), Great Barrington Ma.Open June-Sept Tel 413 528 4619, ( OR by appointment 518 821 2042) Our warehouse in Kyoto is located 15 minutes from downtown in the village of Yase.(Open Sept 15th-May 28th, call for appointment when in Kyoto, Tel. 81 090 3848 8934) Our web site contains many exceptional pieces and is a fine alternative if you can’t make the trip to Boston, Great Barrington or Kyoto. For over 30 years Mundy’s Asia Galleries has provided authentic Buddhist Artifacts and other Asian antiques to museums, Antique shops and collecters around the globe. Please enjoy our site.
Always Check The New arrival Category for the most recent wins at the Japanese Auctions. Thank You, Rhett Mundy – Gallery & Warehouse Owner

ASAHI WEEKLY: TOKYO, JAPAN SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2007 By Matthias Ley.

“MUNDY HAS A SHARP EYE FOR ASIA’S MOST EXOTIC ANTIQUES! A crisp autumn morning in Kyoto, it is just after 5 a.m., and the first rays of the morning sun are bathing the top of the pagoda of Toji Temple in a golden light. Below, on the usually tranquil temple grounds, dealers are setting up their stalls and shops for the monthly flea market. American antique dealer Rhett Mundy, sporting his trademark GI-style haircut and leather jacket, is already moving quickly from stall to stall, scanning today’s offerings with hawkish eyes. He’s already got some temple bells, a Meiji period bronze vase and a large Shigaraki frog from the early Showa period. Now, near the north gate, he spots a pair of kitsune, Shinto shrine foxes. He swiftly circles in on them, pulls out some cash, talks to the vendor and closes the deal.”(To read article, go to In the Press“)